Slide Left Slide Right
Click the arrows to view more photos.
Replica rolex watches sale, tag heuer replica and cheap ugg boots for sale.
Where To Eat Classic Fisherman’s Soup (Halászlé) in Budapest
Posted by Anna J. Kutor on 10 February, 2015 in 100 Essentials ,Eat ,Explore ,

Halászlé (Fisherman's soup)

Gulyás might be the best-known of Hungarian soups, but halászlé (fisherman’s soup) is an equally-worthy and emblematic Hungarian dish. It is the lesser-sung knockout prepared for centuries by fishermen and their families along the banks of the Danube, Tisza rivers, and Lake Balaton (or wherever else there is freshly-caught fish). Following the Hungarian proverb “as many houses, as many customs”, this local favorite exists in many versions. Some versions include cream, others are served over pasta, but all are made using one or more locally-caught freshwater fish such as carp, pike, perch, catfish, bream or sterlet. It’s a Christmas Eve dinner staple, but the spring-summer fishing season also brings an abundance of raw material for year-round consumption.

Read More

Comments

A Butcher Dishes on Hungarian Meat: Q&A with David Wilkinson
Posted by Carolyn Bánfalvi on 06 February, 2015 in Cook ,

When we first met David Wilkinson a few years ago he was handing out samples of his sausage, which we could not resist going back for until we tried them all. Since then, we have become regular customers of his, and our freezer is  always well-stocked with a good supply of his sausages. David has been living in Budapest for more than ten years, and being a butcher by trade, that means he has had plenty of time to think about (and experiment with) Hungarian meat: how it is different, what works best with it, how to shop for it, and how to handle it. If there’s anyone who can share the best answers to these questions, it is him. We are happy to be teaming-up with David in March when he will be teaching his first-ever “Meat School” at The Tasting Table. The “School” will consist of four hands-on sessions with different themes. The classes will cover butchery and cooking techniques that you can use for the rest of your life, as well as Hungary-specific information which will enhance your shopping (and cooking) experiences here. Many Budapest expats are already familiar with David’s fabulous line of sausage, but he has so much knowledge and skills to share, and we are so excited to be working with him on these classes!

David Wilkinson's Meat School

In advance of the classes, we asked David a few questions about meat, art, and cooking. Read More

Comments

Budapest’s Kórház Utcai Market
Posted by Anna J. Kutor on 03 February, 2015 in 100 Essentials ,Explore ,Shop ,

Kórház utcai Market Budapest

Budapest has so many off-the-beaten-track tourist activities, but a simple visit to a neighborhood market may be one of the most entertaining and enriching of them all. One of the small chores and rituals of everyday Hungarian life, shopping for seasonal produce affords the opportunity to exchange a few smiles and meet some endearing characters while buying your sweet paprika.

Kórház utcai Market Budapest

Read More

Comments

Food & Wine Event Guide: January / February
Posted by Anna J. Kutor on 26 January, 2015 in Explore ,

Our month-by-month guide to the best food and wine events in Budapest

168980_10150100518582412_6581567_n

Furmint February Grand Tasting

Don’t forget, we organize our own food and wine events @The Tasting Table. Check our calendar for what we have in the works!

Read More

Comments

Birsalma Sajt (Quince Jelly)
Posted by Anna J. Kutor on 23 January, 2015 in Cook ,

Birsalmasajt (quince paste)

The knobby quince has never been one of the most popular fruits. But come autumn, even the humble quince turns into a riot of taste and texture when cooked into a firm jelly. With a consistent bumper harvest of fruits throughout the autumn, Hungarians have grown used to utilizing the season’s bounty in a myriad of ways—fresh, fermented, dried, cooked, and preserved. Even quince (birsalma or birskorte), a rather unattractive and under-appreciated fruit due to its bracingly bitter flavor, becomes a seasonal delicacy when stewed in sugar and water.

Read More

Comments

Hungarian Paprika—The Essential Red Spice
Posted by Carolyn Bánfalvi on 21 January, 2015 in 100 Essentials ,Cook ,Shop ,

Hungarian paprika

If there is one ingredient that Hungary is undeniably associated with, it is, of course, paprika. Though peppers were not introduced to Hungary until the 16th century, the spice symbolizes Hungarian cuisine and is an essential component of some of the best-known Hungarian dishes, including gulyás, pörkölt (stew), chicken paprikás, and halászlé (fisherman’s soup). Paprika gives these dishes their brilliant orange color, and the intense peppery flavor and aroma so characteristic of Hungarian cuisine. “There is something about paprika itself that makes it synonymous with ‘Hungarian.’ ‘Fiery,’ ‘spicy,’ ‘temperamental’—all these adjectives suggest both paprika and the national character,” writes George Lang in The Cuisine of Hungary. “Paprika is to the Hungarian cuisine as wit is to its conversation—not just a superficial garnish, but an integral element, a very special and unique flavor instantly recognizable.” 

Read More

Comments

Paprikás Csirke (Paprika Chicken)
Posted by Carolyn Bánfalvi on 19 January, 2015 in 100 Essentials ,Cook ,

Paprikás Csirke (Paprika Chicken)

Paprikás csirke (pronounced paprikash cheerke) is one of the most classic of Hungarian dishes. Named for the large amount of paprika that goes into the sauce, the paprikás method can also be applied to veal, mushrooms, or fish. In fact, according to George Lang in The Cuisine of Hungary, it is one of the four pillars of Hungarian cooking (the others are gulyás, pörkölt, and tokány). “The chief difference between pörkölt and paprikás is that paprikás is usually finished with sweet or sour cream, sometimes mixed with a little flour, but always stirred in just before serving,” writes Lang. “You may never use cream of any kind for gulyás or pörkölt! Also, beef, mutton, game, goose, duck, and pork are most popular for pörkölt; veal and chicken for paprikás.”

Read More

Comments

The Hungarian Cold Plate (Hidegtál)
Posted by Carolyn Bánfalvi on 10 January, 2015 in 100 Essentials ,Cook ,Eat ,

Hungarian Hidegtal (Cold Plate

A Hungarian cold plate (“hidegtál”) is a classic way to showcase the wide variety of charcuterie which butcher shops, market stalls, and kitchen pantries are brimming with. When a cold plate is offered on restaurant menus, fancy restaurants will dress it up with slices of foie gras or smoked goose breast. At home it can be as simple as an old wooden cutting board piled with rustic sausages, home-grown vegetables, pickles, or whatever else is on hand. The components are always different, depending on who prepares it, and it can serve as anything from breakfast to a light meal or an appetizer to nibble on while the main meal is being prepared.

No matter where it is served, the hidegtál is a celebration of pork, which is the meat of choice in Hungary. “Perhaps the extraordinary quality of pork in Hungary contributed to the popularity of dishes made with pork, or perhaps it was the other way around,” writes George Lang in The Cuisine of Hungary. “The fact is that what beef is to Argentina and veal to Italy, pork is to Hungary.”

Read More

Comments

Budapest’s Nagy Vásárcsarnok (Central Market Hall)
Posted by Carolyn Bánfalvi on 17 January, 2015 in 100 Essentials ,Explore ,Shop ,

Words by Carolyn Bánfalvi. Photos by Anna J. Kutor.

Budapest's Nagy Vásárcsarnok (Central Market Hall)

One of my favorite things about living in Budapest, even after being here for many years now, is the neighborhood food markets. Beyond the main market halls found in most districts, there are more and more groups starting farmer’s markets, and shopping at weekly farmer’s markets like the one at Szimpla Kert is how I wish I could spend every lazy Sunday morning. But even though the Central Market is Budapest’s largest market and one of the city’s top tourist attractions, every time I head across the Danube from my apartment in Buda to shop there, I am still thrilled by the experience and delighted by the bountiful selection spread out over the market’s three levels.

Read More

Comments

Sunday Lunch in Hungary
Posted by Carolyn Bánfalvi on 15 January, 2015 in 100 Essentials ,Eat ,Explore ,

Hungarian Outdoor Sunday Lunch

Sunday lunch is practically a sacred ritual in Hungary. This I learned soon after arriving on my very first visit. I found myself sitting at a table set under towering chestnut and walnut trees, eating the kind of meal that would have only been prepared on holidays in my family. It was the ideal introduction to this cuisine that was new to me. I had come to visit Gábor (now my husband) for the summer. He had already told me stories about his mother’s cooking, his epic family meals, and all the Hungarian dishes that he missed so much when he was away from home. Now, I would taste it all for myself.

First there were shots of homemade pálinka, walnut liqueur, and other spirits poured unceremoniously from used plastic water and soda bottles into stout shot glasses. The meal began with húsleves, a rich consommé which was a staple at welcome meals prepared by Gábor’s mom, Kati, I would later learn. Prepared with beef or poultry, húsleves is made by slowly simmering bones and meat, and adding whole root vegetables and homemade pinched pasta when it is nearly done. For me, it has come to typify Hungarian cuisine more than almost any other dish. At the table, everyone added their own hot paprika. And a long hot green pepper was passed around the table from which everybody cut thin slices directly into their bowls.

Read More

Comments

Loading your cart... Cart